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20130104
20130112
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in the 1700's which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of arcs of one of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a -- ebbs and flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> nadine. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off with a general
administration has now restored the civil rights of more virginians than any other administration in the history of virginia. [applause] here is the plan. here in virginia, in the cradle of democracy, we enact policies that actually work. in washington, we see debt, taxes, delays, blank, and this function. but here in virginia, we see results, solutions, job growth, surpluses, and cooperation. what a difference 9 miles can make. -- 90 miles can make. virginia is ranked as america's most livable state and the best day in which to make a living. i think you will know that every other major national business publications puts virginia in the top three best states in which to do business. while that is all good, there are many areas of believe we must play a much stronger foundation for the future of our commonwealth. this session, i am asking you to work with me to get a few big things done that i believe will create more jobs and more opportunities for our people. when you leave here on time, in 45 days, i want to be able to report to our citizens that our schools are on the way to being the most
, as well as the college students were. and it was the height of the civil rights movement. the vietnam war. so many issues to become engaged in. so i started moving up the ladder at the college station, interned at a local all-news radio station, and that was the end of the violin. >> then you just kept working at it and loved it? >> it wasn't quite that simple. it was in a day when they did not hire women for newsroom jobs in broadcasting. period. there were a few anchor women, a few weather women, there were just not average run of the mill journalist assignment reporters, and i was told they weren't about to do it at this radio station, and i could go into advertising or promotion. i was accepted in the corporate trainee program, actually, and i said, hire me as a copy boy, which is what they -- they require copy. it's predigital -- back in the days of film and television and a very different era. so they give me the midnight to 8:00 shift, and said if i prove myself, there where no one would see me, i might -- and i worked my way up. i don't know if that's your experience as well. i i'
produce, it is a little murky. i'm not so sure whether you are concerned about the civil rights of the prisoners or the fact that guantanamo bay itself is something the u.s. should not keep open. -- listening to you, it is a little murky. so my question, is it closing guantanamo bay or giving justice to the people and the 186 people? when you go on that track, and everybody loses track of what is really the issue. >> i don't understand the distinction. it's not just to hold people indefinitely without. guantanamo is the symbol of that. you've got to get them out of there and close it. >> i don't want to get in an argument. >> your first point about the cost, not the economic cost that you can put a dollar figure on but the cost to america, the intangible cost. i think we saw that not long ago with the man extradited from the u.k. to america. i guess the u.k. is our closest allies in the war on terror and our closest ally made us promise that before they would extradite him we would not send them to guantanamo, that he would not be prosecuted in the military commission, which to
into enforcement to the extent that a lot of advocates, particularly civil rights advocates, are actually very angry about it. it's never going to be perfect. i think that that's the place where the last comment that you read comes forward. we still have people who do constantly believe that a lot of them are criminals, drugging drugs or people. nobody wants that. so the question is, how much more needs to happen on the border and inside the united states before other kinds of reforms can happen? i believe that what the administration has been trying to say for the last two years is we've done that. look at the number of people we deported, something like 400,000 people, which is more than any president ever has in the last, you know, in all of history. the border is looking much better. i've been down, i've looked at it, it's looking better, but there are still problems. the question is, is it ok? that's going to be -- there's going to be competing versions of that no matter what happens. host: here are some of those numbers. on u.s. immigrant deportations, you can see the total so far during
that any kind of technology that was around when you were born is right and natural. is in the natural order of things. anything that comes along and around the age of 35 is fascinating and exciting and brilliant. anything that comes along after that is best to civilization and is going to destroy humanity as we know it. i think i am very lucky in having the job that i do, because i don't have the leisure to be incredibly blessed doubt it for my childhood. that was a world that i was not part of an was unlikely to ever be a part of. the kind of coverage that we get from anybody with a cell phone, all over the world, sullivan unreliable, is still astonishing and necessary. you brought up the arab spring. it brought up real-life coverage of hurricane sandy. it is everywhere we need to be, to paraphrase some advertisement or other. it is a great, wonderful new world. the big difference is that you as the news consumer have to do the work they did not have to do before. you have to choose your pension plan, your healthcare plan, paper or plastic. you have everything thrown in your lap, and
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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